Press

Please email everybody.world@framenoir.com with all press inquires. 

For a story in T’s Culture issue, Carol Lim and Humberto Leon invited 25 American (or working-in-America) guests to a series of imaginary dinner parties. We asked them to contemplate the country now, and in the future. Read: Around America's Dinner Table on T: The New York Times Style Magazine

i-D

After being wrongfully imprisoned for 21 years, Fulton Leroy Washington was granted clemency by Obama. But he still lacks the freedoms that over-turning his conviction would provide. Read: buy these t-shirts and help clear an innocent man's name on i-D

Business of Fashion

The rise of ‘merch’ has made the blank T-shirt business better than ever. But there’s more to the story. Read: Why Blank T-Shirts Are Big Business on BOF

AdWeek

A charming (if mildly disjointed) new commercial from a Los Angeles-based ethical clothing company takes an old adage—”the medium is the message”—to a new level. Read: Everything About This Ad, From the Film to the Audio, Is 100% Recycled on AdWeek 

The New York Times

One cool thing about fashion — besides the bedazzled footwear, the outlandish cotton candy-colored fur and the enormous purses — is that a lot of very cool women work in it, a fact worth celebrating on International Women’s Day. Read: Why Work Wives Are the Future of Fashion on The New York Times 

The Standard

The New York Times dubbed American Apparel alum Iris Alonzo as "the most influential former senior creative director you have never heard of." After she and fellow influential American Apparel alum Carolina Crespo left the brand in 2015, they started an equally game-changing venture, Everybody World Opens a New Window. Read: A Clothing Brand for Every Body and the World, Made by Everybody World on The Standard

The Strategist

There’s no denying that prestige tote bags are on the rise. Read: The Coveted Tote Bags That Scream ‘Status’ on The Strategist

Girlboss

You know what Whitney Houston said about the children; they’re our future. Teach them well and let them lead the way etc. Read: We Asked 6 Teen Bosses How They’d Change The World If They Were In Charge on Girlboss

i-D

Dana Boulos shoots a campaign for Paloma’s colorful EVERYBODY.WORLD collaboration, modeled by the teen designer’s IRL friends. Read: this 13-year-old artist designed new york fashion week’s coolest pants on i-D

Cool Hunting

A line of wearable separates from the sustainable brand and the 80-something designer. Read: EVERYBODY.WORLD + Delores Kerr’s capsule collection on Cool Hunting

VICE

Fashion is the second most polluting industry in the world. Clothes made from 100% recycled cotton could help change that. Watch: The Trash Tee on VICE

 Sight Unseen

As former creative leads at American Apparel, it’s no surprise that Iris Alonzo and Carolina Crespo have an idiosyncratic sense of what counts as basic. Read: The Glass-Walled LA Loft of New Fashion Brand Everybody is Anything But Basic on Sight Unseen

WePresent

Andreas Tzortzis visited the Los Angeles-based company EVERYBODY.WORLD to talk about bringing genuinely new ideas into the fashion world. Read: If you can put a why behind every single garment, that's really worthwhile on WePresent

Vogue

After posting its first call for submissions for unisex shoe designs last October, founders Iris Alonzo and Carolina Crespo are releasing the winning design today: a backless shoe from the Oakland, California, couple Essence and Jihaari. Read: Are Crowdsourced Designs the Future of Fashion? This L.A. Brand Says Yes on Vogue LS:N Global

Everybody is a new online clothing and lifestyle brand that focuses on ethical production methods. Read: Clothes for Everybody on LS:N

Refinery29

When a duo of longtime American Apparel alums join forces to launch their own fashion endeavor, it'd make sense for high-quality cotton basics to factor heavily into the equation. Read: American Apparel Alums Set Out To Make The Perfect Shirt — Behold, The Trash Tee on Refinery29

Fashionista

Immigrants represent a significant portion of the fashion industry's skilled workforce, and the current political administration’s anti-immigration stance runs counter to any hope of bringing garment manufacturing back to the U.S. Read: U.S. Garment Production Wouldn't Be a Thing Without Immigrants on Fashionista

Racked

 Your new favorite basics have a story. Read: What to Buy at Everybody, the Buzzy Basics Brand That Crowdsources Its Collection on Racked

Westwood

Carolina Crespo and Iris Alonzo are the inspiring duo behind EVERYBODY.WORLD—an eco-conscious clothing line that has something for, you guessed it, everyone. Read: Iris Alonzo + Carolina Crespo Co-Founders of EVERYBODY.WORLD on Westwood

Purple Diary

Inspired by reality – people, cultures, science, history, and life, the concept of EVERYBODY is based on collaboration and innovation. Read: Everybody, Founded By Iris Alonzo And Carolina Crespo, Presentation At Jean Pigozzi’s Ettore Sottsass Apartment, New York on PurpleW Magazine

Jean Pigozzi is a prominent art collector and a successful business man. At this point, he has just about everything he could possibly desire. Read: A Body Pillow Fit for Jean Pigozzi, the Man Who Has (Almost) Everything on W Magazine

i-D

Producing everything from a seven-foot-long snake-shaped pillow to the world’s first totally recycled cotton T-shirt, EVERYBODY is reinventing what a fashion company can be — with help from a network of magically diverse collaborators. Read: the pioneering new company whose designers include a dog and a two-year-old on i-D 

The Guardian

The ethical label by two former employees of the troubled US brand shows the future of fashion – in basics and beyond. Read: Is Everybody the natural successor to American Apparel? on The Guardian

Vogue

Once you’ve defined the aesthetic of your generation—or at least, to paraphrase Girls’s Hannah Horvath, an aesthetic of a generation—where do you go from there? Read: The Creatives Who Shaped American Apparel Debut a New Brand—And It’s for Everybody on Vogue

The New York Times

Iris Alonzo was reflecting, with mock regret, on the success of the deep V-neck T-shirt she helped create for American Apparel years ago. Read: There Is Life After American Apparel on The New York Times